Dental Management of Patients Who Have Undergone Oral Cancer Therapy

9.95
Online
Elective
About the Course
Complications are new medical problems that occur during or after a disease, procedure, or treatment and that make recovery harder. Oral complications are common in patients with head and neck cancer. The complications may be side effects of the disease or treatment, or they may have other causes.

Cancer patients have a high risk of oral complications due to chemotherapy and radiation. Chemotherapy treatments slow or stop the growth of fast growing cancer cells, but also stop normal cell growth in the lining of the mouth which slows down the ability of oral tissue to repair itself. Radiation therapy may directly damage and break down oral tissue, salivary glands, and bone. Chemotherapy and radiation therapy upset the healthy balance of bacteria in the mouth, and cause changes in the lining of the mouth and the salivary glands. This can upset the healthy balance of bacteria and lead to mucositis, infections, and tooth decay.

This basic-level course appropriate for dentists, hygienists and assistants, reviews the complications seen in the oral cavity associated with oral cancer therapies and how to help patients mitigate these complications. The course outlines changes seen in the skin, oral mucosa, teeth, bone, salivary glands, muscles of mastication, temporomandibular joint, tongue, taste buds, and sequelae such as neurotoxicity, pain, and oral infections. This information will help the practitioner provide up to date care for their patients undergoing oral cancer treatment.

Course Objectives
  1. Identify the effects of oral cancer therapies on the skin and oral mucosa, and the methods to prevent and treat them.
  2. Recognize the effects oral cancer therapies have on the hard tissues of the oral cavity including teeth and bone, and how to prevent and treat them.
  3. Describe how the salivary glands, muscles of mastication, temporomandibular joint, tongue and taste buds are affected by oral cancer therapies, and how to manage these sequelae.
  4. Explain how to treat neurotoxicity, pain, and oral infections as complications of oral cancer therapies.


About the Author

Veronica Powers, DMD, received a BS degree from Providence College and a DMD degree from the Oregon Health & Science University. After working for four years as a general dentist in Portland, Oregon, Dr. Powers returned to New York City to serve as lead dentist for Phoenix House Foundation in Brooklyn, New York, where she provided comprehensive treatment for the residents of a rehabilitation facility. In this capacity, she performed simple and surgical extractions and root canals and placed crowns, bridges, and removable prosthodontics. Dr. Powers created the protocol for the day-to-day management of the clinic and became especially adept at treating anxious patients. Now in private practice, Dr. Powers is licensed to practice dentistry in the state of New York, maintains registration with the Drug Enforcement Administration, and is CPR-certified. She has provided volunteer dentistry in India and in Chiapas, Mexico, and has worked with the American Dental Association’s Give Kids a Smile program in the United States.

AGD Subject Code: 730
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Dental Management of Patients Who Have Undergone Oral Cancer Therapy

9.95
About the Course
Complications are new medical problems that occur during or after a disease, procedure, or treatment and that make recovery harder. Oral complications are common in patients with head and neck cancer. The complications may be side effects of the disease or treatment, or they may have other causes.

Cancer patients have a high risk of oral complications due to chemotherapy and radiation. Chemotherapy treatments slow or stop the growth of fast growing cancer cells, but also stop normal cell growth in the lining of the mouth which slows down the ability of oral tissue to repair itself. Radiation therapy may directly damage and break down oral tissue, salivary glands, and bone. Chemotherapy and radiation therapy upset the healthy balance of bacteria in the mouth, and cause changes in the lining of the mouth and the salivary glands. This can upset the healthy balance of bacteria and lead to mucositis, infections, and tooth decay.

This basic-level course appropriate for dentists, hygienists and assistants, reviews the complications seen in the oral cavity associated with oral cancer therapies and how to help patients mitigate these complications. The course outlines changes seen in the skin, oral mucosa, teeth, bone, salivary glands, muscles of mastication, temporomandibular joint, tongue, taste buds, and sequelae such as neurotoxicity, pain, and oral infections. This information will help the practitioner provide up to date care for their patients undergoing oral cancer treatment.

Course Objectives
  1. Identify the effects of oral cancer therapies on the skin and oral mucosa, and the methods to prevent and treat them.
  2. Recognize the effects oral cancer therapies have on the hard tissues of the oral cavity including teeth and bone, and how to prevent and treat them.
  3. Describe how the salivary glands, muscles of mastication, temporomandibular joint, tongue and taste buds are affected by oral cancer therapies, and how to manage these sequelae.
  4. Explain how to treat neurotoxicity, pain, and oral infections as complications of oral cancer therapies.


About the Author

Veronica Powers, DMD, received a BS degree from Providence College and a DMD degree from the Oregon Health & Science University. After working for four years as a general dentist in Portland, Oregon, Dr. Powers returned to New York City to serve as lead dentist for Phoenix House Foundation in Brooklyn, New York, where she provided comprehensive treatment for the residents of a rehabilitation facility. In this capacity, she performed simple and surgical extractions and root canals and placed crowns, bridges, and removable prosthodontics. Dr. Powers created the protocol for the day-to-day management of the clinic and became especially adept at treating anxious patients. Now in private practice, Dr. Powers is licensed to practice dentistry in the state of New York, maintains registration with the Drug Enforcement Administration, and is CPR-certified. She has provided volunteer dentistry in India and in Chiapas, Mexico, and has worked with the American Dental Association’s Give Kids a Smile program in the United States.

AGD Subject Code: 730