Dental Public Health Practice, Infrastructure, and Workforce in the United States

29.95
Online
Elective
About the Course
Dental Public Health (DPH) is that part of dentistry providing leadership and expertise in population-based dentistry, oral health surveillance, policy development, community-based disease prevention and health promotion, and the maintenance of the dental safety net. DPH and the private practice model of care delivery together bear the responsibility of assuring optimal oral health for all Americans - individuals and populations.

One of the greatest barriers to oral health care is a lack of dental services. This can be called the greatest unmet oral health need in the United States. Many people living in the United States have poor oral health due to lack of access to care, because oral health is not universally integrated into primary or behavioral health-care services. As a result, dental care is usually set apart from other types of health care. Poor appearance resulting from dental problems can contribute to social isolation, lower wages, and loss of self-esteem. Furthermore, poor oral health is associated with increased bacterial systemic exposure and increased inflammatory factors that can lead to adverse health outcomes, such as uncontrolled diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and respiratory disease. Facilities and programs are available under the public health framework to educate and treat vulnerable populations and improve oral and overall health.

This basic level course, appropriate for all dental professionals, outlines dental public health, its focus, infrastructure, and how the dental public health workforce strives to improve populations oral health.

Course Objectives
  1. Recognize how dental public health is unique among specialties and the expertise it requires.
  2. Describe the cornerstone of dental public health.
  3. Identify the core functions of dental public health.
  4. Name the organizations that make up the infrastructure of dental public health.
  5. Recognize the Professional Organizations that serve dental public health providers.
  6. Identify members of the dental public health workforce.

About the Author
Veronica Powers, DMD, received a BS degree from Providence College and a DMD degree from the Oregon Health & Science University. After working for four years as a general dentist in Portland, Oregon, Dr. Powers returned to New York City to serve as lead dentist for Phoenix House Foundation in Brooklyn, New York, where she provided comprehensive treatment for the residents of a rehabilitation facility. In this capacity, she performed simple and surgical extractions and root canals and placed crowns, bridges, and removable prosthodontics. Dr. Powers created the protocol for the day-to-day management of the clinic and became especially adept at treating anxious patients. Now in private practice, Dr. Powers is licensed to practice dentistry in the state of New York, maintains registration with the Drug Enforcement Administration, and is CPR-certified. She has provided volunteer dentistry in India and in Chiapas, Mexico, and has worked with the American Dental Association’s Give Kids a Smile program in the United States.

AGD Subject Code: 149
Want Unlimited CE? Become a Member

Dental Public Health Practice, Infrastructure, and Workforce in the United States

29.95
About the Course
Dental Public Health (DPH) is that part of dentistry providing leadership and expertise in population-based dentistry, oral health surveillance, policy development, community-based disease prevention and health promotion, and the maintenance of the dental safety net. DPH and the private practice model of care delivery together bear the responsibility of assuring optimal oral health for all Americans - individuals and populations.

One of the greatest barriers to oral health care is a lack of dental services. This can be called the greatest unmet oral health need in the United States. Many people living in the United States have poor oral health due to lack of access to care, because oral health is not universally integrated into primary or behavioral health-care services. As a result, dental care is usually set apart from other types of health care. Poor appearance resulting from dental problems can contribute to social isolation, lower wages, and loss of self-esteem. Furthermore, poor oral health is associated with increased bacterial systemic exposure and increased inflammatory factors that can lead to adverse health outcomes, such as uncontrolled diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and respiratory disease. Facilities and programs are available under the public health framework to educate and treat vulnerable populations and improve oral and overall health.

This basic level course, appropriate for all dental professionals, outlines dental public health, its focus, infrastructure, and how the dental public health workforce strives to improve populations oral health.

Course Objectives
  1. Recognize how dental public health is unique among specialties and the expertise it requires.
  2. Describe the cornerstone of dental public health.
  3. Identify the core functions of dental public health.
  4. Name the organizations that make up the infrastructure of dental public health.
  5. Recognize the Professional Organizations that serve dental public health providers.
  6. Identify members of the dental public health workforce.

About the Author
Veronica Powers, DMD, received a BS degree from Providence College and a DMD degree from the Oregon Health & Science University. After working for four years as a general dentist in Portland, Oregon, Dr. Powers returned to New York City to serve as lead dentist for Phoenix House Foundation in Brooklyn, New York, where she provided comprehensive treatment for the residents of a rehabilitation facility. In this capacity, she performed simple and surgical extractions and root canals and placed crowns, bridges, and removable prosthodontics. Dr. Powers created the protocol for the day-to-day management of the clinic and became especially adept at treating anxious patients. Now in private practice, Dr. Powers is licensed to practice dentistry in the state of New York, maintains registration with the Drug Enforcement Administration, and is CPR-certified. She has provided volunteer dentistry in India and in Chiapas, Mexico, and has worked with the American Dental Association’s Give Kids a Smile program in the United States.

AGD Subject Code: 149