Dental: Erosion-Related Tooth Wear: Pathogenesis, Diagnosis, and Treatment

9.95
Online
Elective
Please select your state to enroll in this course
About the Course: 
Dental erosion is a progressive loss of dental hard tissue caused by chemical processes without involvement of bacteria. This enamel dissolution is an irreversible process not directly associated with mechanical or traumatic factors, which distinguishes it from other types of wear, such as attrition (loss of tooth structure due to clenching or grinding), abrasion (mechanical loss of tooth structure caused by a foreign element), or abfraction (loss of tooth structure at the gumline due to occlusal forces). The clinical features of dental erosion appear as well-defined, wedge-shaped areas facially and cervically. The occurrence of enamel erosion lesions is associated primarily with intrinsic and extrinsic acids.The rise in consumption of soft drinks, including sports drinks, has been linked to increases in the rates of dental erosion. The additives to these drinks, not the beverage pH per se, appear to be the causative factors contributing to enamel dissolution. Furthermore, fruit-flavored drinks and unsweetened juices appear to have the same erosive potential as carbonated drinks This basic-level course provides dentists, dental hygienists, and dental assistants with guidelines for recognizing and diagnosing dental erosion and offers suggestions for preventive interventions, including record-keeping, nutritional counseling, fluoride use, and home-care procedures. The course also discusses recommended restorative treatment options. 


Course Objectives: 
After completing this course, the learner will be able to: 
1. Explain the etiology of tooth wear and the pathogenic process of tooth erosion. 
2. Describe the protocol in patient assessment and diagnosis of erosion. 
3. Describe prevention and restorative treatment approaches for erosion-related tooth wear. 

About the Authors: 
John F. Kross, DMD, MSc, received his doctorate in dental medicine from Temple University School of Dentistry in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. He completed a fellowship at Temple University Hospital in oral oncology and received a hospital appointment to the Department of Dentistry at the Medical Centers of Delaware (now the Christiana Health Care System). His professional training and experience include practicing general dentistry in Wilmington, Delaware, and in New London, Pennsylvania, as well as instructing students at Delaware Technical Community College in oral pathology. Dr. Kross has received numerous academic awards for his work in oral surgery, fixed partial prosthodontics, periodontics, and endodontics. He has been composing monographs, manuscripts, and continuing medical education courses since 1991. 

AGD code - 741
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Erosion-Related Tooth Wear: Pathogenesis, Diagnosis, and Treatment

9.95
About the Course: 
Dental erosion is a progressive loss of dental hard tissue caused by chemical processes without involvement of bacteria. This enamel dissolution is an irreversible process not directly associated with mechanical or traumatic factors, which distinguishes it from other types of wear, such as attrition (loss of tooth structure due to clenching or grinding), abrasion (mechanical loss of tooth structure caused by a foreign element), or abfraction (loss of tooth structure at the gumline due to occlusal forces). The clinical features of dental erosion appear as well-defined, wedge-shaped areas facially and cervically. The occurrence of enamel erosion lesions is associated primarily with intrinsic and extrinsic acids.The rise in consumption of soft drinks, including sports drinks, has been linked to increases in the rates of dental erosion. The additives to these drinks, not the beverage pH per se, appear to be the causative factors contributing to enamel dissolution. Furthermore, fruit-flavored drinks and unsweetened juices appear to have the same erosive potential as carbonated drinks This basic-level course provides dentists, dental hygienists, and dental assistants with guidelines for recognizing and diagnosing dental erosion and offers suggestions for preventive interventions, including record-keeping, nutritional counseling, fluoride use, and home-care procedures. The course also discusses recommended restorative treatment options. 


Course Objectives: 
After completing this course, the learner will be able to: 
1. Explain the etiology of tooth wear and the pathogenic process of tooth erosion. 
2. Describe the protocol in patient assessment and diagnosis of erosion. 
3. Describe prevention and restorative treatment approaches for erosion-related tooth wear. 

About the Authors: 
John F. Kross, DMD, MSc, received his doctorate in dental medicine from Temple University School of Dentistry in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. He completed a fellowship at Temple University Hospital in oral oncology and received a hospital appointment to the Department of Dentistry at the Medical Centers of Delaware (now the Christiana Health Care System). His professional training and experience include practicing general dentistry in Wilmington, Delaware, and in New London, Pennsylvania, as well as instructing students at Delaware Technical Community College in oral pathology. Dr. Kross has received numerous academic awards for his work in oral surgery, fixed partial prosthodontics, periodontics, and endodontics. He has been composing monographs, manuscripts, and continuing medical education courses since 1991. 

AGD code - 741