Evaluation and Management of Oral Potentially Malignant Disorders

19.95
Online
Elective
About the Course
The term “potentially malignant disorders” was defined by World Health Organization (WHO) as the risk of malignancy being present in a lesion or condition either during the time of initial diagnosis or at a future date. WHO also classified potentially malignant disorders into two subgroups: precancerous lesion, a benign lesion with morphologically altered tissue, which has a greater than normal risk of transforming into malignancy; and precancerous condition, a disease or patients’ habit that does not necessarily alter the clinical appearance of local tissues but is associated with a greater than normal risk of precancerous lesion or cancer development in that tissue.

Many oral squamous cell carcinomas develop from potentially malignant disorders. Correct diagnosis and timely treatment of PMDs may help prevent malignant transformation in oral lesions. Lack of awareness about signs and symptoms of oral PMDs among the general population and even physicians are believed to be responsible for the diagnostic delay of these entities.

This intermediate level course, appropriate for dental professionals, discusses oral leukoplakia, oral erythroplakia, oral lichen planus, oral submucous fibrosis and proliferative verrucous leukoplakia, their clinical presentation, and how to diagnose and manage these potentially malignant disorders.

Course Objectives
  1. Identify the epidemiology and clinical presentation of oral leukoplakia, erythroplakia, lichen planus, submucous fibrosis and proliferative verrucous leukoplakia.
  2. Describe the evaluation methods used in screening for oral potentially malignant disorders.
  3. Distinguish the methods of diagnosing and how to differentiate the grading of oral potentially malignant disorders.
  4. Identify how to manage oral potentially malignant disorders.

About the Author
Veronica Powers, DMD, received a BS degree from Providence College and a DMD degree from the Oregon Health & Science University. After working for four years as a general dentist in Portland, Oregon, Dr. Powers returned to New York City to serve as lead dentist for Phoenix House Foundation in Brooklyn, New York, where she provided comprehensive treatment for the residents of a rehabilitation facility. In this capacity, she performed simple and surgical extractions and root canals and placed crowns, bridges, and removable prosthodontics. Dr. Powers created the protocol for the day-to-day management of the clinic and became especially adept at treating anxious patients. Now in private practice, Dr. Powers is licensed to practice dentistry in the state of New York, maintains registration with the Drug Enforcement Administration, and is CPR-certified. She has provided volunteer dentistry in India and in Chiapas, Mexico, and has worked with the American Dental Association’s Give Kids a Smile program in the United States.

AGD Subject Code: 730
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Evaluation and Management of Oral Potentially Malignant Disorders

19.95
About the Course
The term “potentially malignant disorders” was defined by World Health Organization (WHO) as the risk of malignancy being present in a lesion or condition either during the time of initial diagnosis or at a future date. WHO also classified potentially malignant disorders into two subgroups: precancerous lesion, a benign lesion with morphologically altered tissue, which has a greater than normal risk of transforming into malignancy; and precancerous condition, a disease or patients’ habit that does not necessarily alter the clinical appearance of local tissues but is associated with a greater than normal risk of precancerous lesion or cancer development in that tissue.

Many oral squamous cell carcinomas develop from potentially malignant disorders. Correct diagnosis and timely treatment of PMDs may help prevent malignant transformation in oral lesions. Lack of awareness about signs and symptoms of oral PMDs among the general population and even physicians are believed to be responsible for the diagnostic delay of these entities.

This intermediate level course, appropriate for dental professionals, discusses oral leukoplakia, oral erythroplakia, oral lichen planus, oral submucous fibrosis and proliferative verrucous leukoplakia, their clinical presentation, and how to diagnose and manage these potentially malignant disorders.

Course Objectives
  1. Identify the epidemiology and clinical presentation of oral leukoplakia, erythroplakia, lichen planus, submucous fibrosis and proliferative verrucous leukoplakia.
  2. Describe the evaluation methods used in screening for oral potentially malignant disorders.
  3. Distinguish the methods of diagnosing and how to differentiate the grading of oral potentially malignant disorders.
  4. Identify how to manage oral potentially malignant disorders.

About the Author
Veronica Powers, DMD, received a BS degree from Providence College and a DMD degree from the Oregon Health & Science University. After working for four years as a general dentist in Portland, Oregon, Dr. Powers returned to New York City to serve as lead dentist for Phoenix House Foundation in Brooklyn, New York, where she provided comprehensive treatment for the residents of a rehabilitation facility. In this capacity, she performed simple and surgical extractions and root canals and placed crowns, bridges, and removable prosthodontics. Dr. Powers created the protocol for the day-to-day management of the clinic and became especially adept at treating anxious patients. Now in private practice, Dr. Powers is licensed to practice dentistry in the state of New York, maintains registration with the Drug Enforcement Administration, and is CPR-certified. She has provided volunteer dentistry in India and in Chiapas, Mexico, and has worked with the American Dental Association’s Give Kids a Smile program in the United States.

AGD Subject Code: 730