Dental: Pediatric Dental-Focused Interprofessional Interventions

9.95
Online
Elective
Please select your state to enroll in this course
About the Course
Early Childhood Caries (ECC) is defined as the presence of one or more decayed (non-cavitated or cavitated lesions), missing (due to caries), or filled tooth surfaces in any primary tooth in a preschool-age child between birth and 71 months of age. The American Dental Association recognizes that ECC is a significant public health problem in selected populations and is also found throughout the general population.

Association between ECC and the socioeconomic status has been well documented. Studies suggested that ECC is more commonly found in children who live in poverty or in poor economic conditions, who belong to ethnic and racial minorities, who are born to single mothers, and whose parents have low educational level, especially those of illiterate mothers. Due to prenatal and perinatal malnutrition or undernourishment, the children in these populations have an increased risk for enamel hypoplasia where exposure to fluorine is likely to be insufficient. These children also have a greater preference for sugary foods. A recent multilevel conceptual model, incorporating influences of ECC exerted at the individual, family, and community level, suggests that both social and behavioral change are important in the prevention of this oral disease.

This basic-level course, appropriate for dentists, hygienists, and assistants, reviews conventional ECC management and discusses the need for unconventional providers and community workers as effective partners in the prevention and management of this disease.

Course Objectives
  1. Explain the early childhood caries problem.
  2. Recognize the effectiveness of conventional family-level early childhood caries behavioral interventions.
  3. Recognize the effectiveness of conventional early childhood caries dental treatment.
  4. Explain the roles of nonconventional health workers in early childhood caries prevention and management.
  5. Identify how the evidence regarding early childhood caries can be used to deliver better care to children and their families.

About the Author
Veronica Powers, DMD, received a BS degree from Providence College and a DMD degree from the Oregon Health & Science University. After working for four years as a general dentist in Portland, Oregon, Dr. Powers returned to New York City to serve as lead dentist for Phoenix House Foundation in Brooklyn, New York, where she provided comprehensive treatment for the residents of a rehabilitation facility. In this capacity, she performed simple and surgical extractions and root canals and placed crowns, bridges, and removable prosthodontics. Dr. Powers created the protocol for the day-to-day management of the clinic and became especially adept at treating anxious patients. Now in private practice, Dr. Powers is licensed to practice dentistry in the state of New York, maintains registration with the Drug Enforcement Administration, and is CPR-certified. She has provided volunteer dentistry in India and in Chiapas, Mexico, and has worked with the American Dental Association’s Give Kids a Smile program in the United States.

AGD Subject Code: 430


Course Disclosures

  • Courses must be completed on or before the course expiration date.
  • You must score 75% or higher on the final exam and complete the course evaluation to pass this course and receive a certificate of completion.
  • Through our review processes, Elite ensures that this course content is presented in a balanced, unbiased manner and is free from commercial influence. It is Elite's policy not to accept commercial support.
  • All persons involved in the planning and development of this course have disclosed no relevant financial relationships or other conflicts of interest related to the course content.
  • There are no prerequisites for this course.
Want Unlimited CE? Become a Member

Pediatric Dental-Focused Interprofessional Interventions

9.95
About the Course
Early Childhood Caries (ECC) is defined as the presence of one or more decayed (non-cavitated or cavitated lesions), missing (due to caries), or filled tooth surfaces in any primary tooth in a preschool-age child between birth and 71 months of age. The American Dental Association recognizes that ECC is a significant public health problem in selected populations and is also found throughout the general population.

Association between ECC and the socioeconomic status has been well documented. Studies suggested that ECC is more commonly found in children who live in poverty or in poor economic conditions, who belong to ethnic and racial minorities, who are born to single mothers, and whose parents have low educational level, especially those of illiterate mothers. Due to prenatal and perinatal malnutrition or undernourishment, the children in these populations have an increased risk for enamel hypoplasia where exposure to fluorine is likely to be insufficient. These children also have a greater preference for sugary foods. A recent multilevel conceptual model, incorporating influences of ECC exerted at the individual, family, and community level, suggests that both social and behavioral change are important in the prevention of this oral disease.

This basic-level course, appropriate for dentists, hygienists, and assistants, reviews conventional ECC management and discusses the need for unconventional providers and community workers as effective partners in the prevention and management of this disease.

Course Objectives
  1. Explain the early childhood caries problem.
  2. Recognize the effectiveness of conventional family-level early childhood caries behavioral interventions.
  3. Recognize the effectiveness of conventional early childhood caries dental treatment.
  4. Explain the roles of nonconventional health workers in early childhood caries prevention and management.
  5. Identify how the evidence regarding early childhood caries can be used to deliver better care to children and their families.

About the Author
Veronica Powers, DMD, received a BS degree from Providence College and a DMD degree from the Oregon Health & Science University. After working for four years as a general dentist in Portland, Oregon, Dr. Powers returned to New York City to serve as lead dentist for Phoenix House Foundation in Brooklyn, New York, where she provided comprehensive treatment for the residents of a rehabilitation facility. In this capacity, she performed simple and surgical extractions and root canals and placed crowns, bridges, and removable prosthodontics. Dr. Powers created the protocol for the day-to-day management of the clinic and became especially adept at treating anxious patients. Now in private practice, Dr. Powers is licensed to practice dentistry in the state of New York, maintains registration with the Drug Enforcement Administration, and is CPR-certified. She has provided volunteer dentistry in India and in Chiapas, Mexico, and has worked with the American Dental Association’s Give Kids a Smile program in the United States.

AGD Subject Code: 430


Course Disclosures

  • Courses must be completed on or before the course expiration date.
  • You must score 75% or higher on the final exam and complete the course evaluation to pass this course and receive a certificate of completion.
  • Through our review processes, Elite ensures that this course content is presented in a balanced, unbiased manner and is free from commercial influence. It is Elite's policy not to accept commercial support.
  • All persons involved in the planning and development of this course have disclosed no relevant financial relationships or other conflicts of interest related to the course content.
  • There are no prerequisites for this course.