Dental: Prescription Drug Abuse Among Dental Patients: Scope, Prevention, and Management Considerations

49.95
Online
Elective
Please select your state to enroll in this course
About the Course: 
The purpose of this basic-level course is to provide dental practitioners with an appreciation of the scope of the problem of prescription drug abuse and a realization that the misuse and abuse of these drugs likely take place among the patient populations they serve. By becoming familiar with the pharmacology of the most commonly abused drugs, the risk factors for developing addictive behaviors, and the manner in which these medications are commonly acquired, dental providers will be positioned to curb prescribing practices that contribute to this growing problem and will be better able to serve their patients and their communities as informed prevention advocates. 

Course Objectives: 
After completing this course, the learner will be able to: 
1. Describe the history and scope of prescription drug abuse and the role of the dental professional. 
2. Define the terminology used in discussing prescription drug abuse. 
3. Explain the pharmacology, physiology, and regulatory control of the prescription drugs that are most commonly abused and the extent and impact of their nonmedical use. 
4. Describe the populations most at risk for abusing prescription drugs and their access to these drugs. 
5. Discuss the tactics and resources available to manage and prevent prescription drug abuse in the dental practice. 

About the Authors:
Jean O’Donnell, DMD, MSN, is the associate dean for academic affairs at the University of Pittsburgh School of Dental Medicine, from which she received her DMD in 1990. She is also the academic integrity officer for the school and chair of the first-professional curriculum committee. Within the same institution, she is an associate professor in the department of Restorative Dentistry and Comprehensive Care. Dr. O’Donnell holds a bachelor’s degree in nursing from Pennsylvania State University and a master’s degree in nursing from the University of Pittsburgh. She is a graduate of the American Dental Education Association (ADEA) Leadership Institute and currently serves as one of the university’s liaisons to the ADEA Commission on Change and Innovation in Dental Education. She is also the dental school’s Women’s Liaison Officer with the ADEA. She is a member of Omicron Kappa Upsilon. Prescription drug abuse and tobacco cessation are among Dr. O’Donnell’s special interests. 

Michael A. Zemaitis, PhD, holds a bachelor’s degree in pharmacy and a PhD in pharmacology. He is a professor in the Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences in the University of Pittsburgh School of Pharmacy, and he teaches in the professional and graduate programs in the School of Pharmacy and the School of Dental Medicine. Dr. Zemaitis’s current area of research interest is biochemical pharmacology, with a special interest in drug and metabolite analysis in biological fluids. He has worked as a consultant for state and federal government entities and is a charter member of the Pennsylvania Drug Utilization Review Board. 

AGD Subject Code: 134
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Prescription Drug Abuse Among Dental Patients: Scope, Prevention, and Management Considerations

49.95
About the Course: 
The purpose of this basic-level course is to provide dental practitioners with an appreciation of the scope of the problem of prescription drug abuse and a realization that the misuse and abuse of these drugs likely take place among the patient populations they serve. By becoming familiar with the pharmacology of the most commonly abused drugs, the risk factors for developing addictive behaviors, and the manner in which these medications are commonly acquired, dental providers will be positioned to curb prescribing practices that contribute to this growing problem and will be better able to serve their patients and their communities as informed prevention advocates. 

Course Objectives: 
After completing this course, the learner will be able to: 
1. Describe the history and scope of prescription drug abuse and the role of the dental professional. 
2. Define the terminology used in discussing prescription drug abuse. 
3. Explain the pharmacology, physiology, and regulatory control of the prescription drugs that are most commonly abused and the extent and impact of their nonmedical use. 
4. Describe the populations most at risk for abusing prescription drugs and their access to these drugs. 
5. Discuss the tactics and resources available to manage and prevent prescription drug abuse in the dental practice. 

About the Authors:
Jean O’Donnell, DMD, MSN, is the associate dean for academic affairs at the University of Pittsburgh School of Dental Medicine, from which she received her DMD in 1990. She is also the academic integrity officer for the school and chair of the first-professional curriculum committee. Within the same institution, she is an associate professor in the department of Restorative Dentistry and Comprehensive Care. Dr. O’Donnell holds a bachelor’s degree in nursing from Pennsylvania State University and a master’s degree in nursing from the University of Pittsburgh. She is a graduate of the American Dental Education Association (ADEA) Leadership Institute and currently serves as one of the university’s liaisons to the ADEA Commission on Change and Innovation in Dental Education. She is also the dental school’s Women’s Liaison Officer with the ADEA. She is a member of Omicron Kappa Upsilon. Prescription drug abuse and tobacco cessation are among Dr. O’Donnell’s special interests. 

Michael A. Zemaitis, PhD, holds a bachelor’s degree in pharmacy and a PhD in pharmacology. He is a professor in the Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences in the University of Pittsburgh School of Pharmacy, and he teaches in the professional and graduate programs in the School of Pharmacy and the School of Dental Medicine. Dr. Zemaitis’s current area of research interest is biochemical pharmacology, with a special interest in drug and metabolite analysis in biological fluids. He has worked as a consultant for state and federal government entities and is a charter member of the Pennsylvania Drug Utilization Review Board. 

AGD Subject Code: 134