Dental: Social Determinants of Pediatric Oral Health

9.95
Online
Elective
Please select your state to enroll in this course
About the Course
Focusing on changing the behaviors of high-risk individuals (mostly on substrate, microbiome, and diet), which is the usual approach in preventive dentistry has not reduced oral health inequalities; in fact, it may have increased them.5 Most behavioral approaches to date have been weak because they tend to be poorly designed and atheoretic and have largely ignored social determinants of health; thus, the recommendations are mostly anecdotal. Using caries risk assessment tools alone is not definitive because of their lack of precision, and the conditions that create dental disease have not changed.5 It is well known that the best predictor for future caries is past caries.5,6 Therefore, a different approach to establishment and maintenance of oral health in children, which leads to good oral health in adulthood, must take into account the many social and biological factors that contribute to the development of the disease.

The purpose of this course is threefold: (1) to provide a brief description and overview of the significant effect of the social determinants of oral health on children, including socioeconomic status (SES), family structure, social environment, culture and healthcare delivery systems; (2) to document the significant oral health inequalities that exist among children and the importance of social environment on oral health outcomes; (3) to advocate for the creation of interventions to improve pediatric oral health that address the interaction amongst multiple levels of risk factors in the socioecological and life course frameworks.

Course Objectives
  1. Define the key areas of social determinants of pediatric oral health.
  2. Describe the research directions to improve prevention and care.

About the Author
Karen D. Hallisey, DMD, is the dental planner at Elite Learning. She received her undergraduate degree at Saint Michael’s College in 1997 before earning her DMD from Tufts University School of Dental Medicine in 2001. Dr. Hallisey is a licensed dentist in the state of Massachusetts and is a member of both the Massachusetts Dental Society and the American Dental Association. She worked as a general dentist in private practice for ten years before deciding to enter the realm of higher education. Along with being the Dental Planner here at Elite Learning, Dr. Hallisey is an associate professor and the Supervising Dentist in the Regis College Department of Dental Hygiene. There she teaches medical emergencies to first year students, pharmacology to second year students, and also serves as the supervising dentist in the second year clinic.

AGD Subject Code: 430


Course Disclosures

  • Courses must be completed on or before the course expiration date.
  • You must score 75% or higher on the final exam and complete the course evaluation to pass this course and receive a certificate of completion.
  • Through our review processes, Elite ensures that this course content is presented in a balanced, unbiased manner and is free from commercial influence. It is Elite's policy not to accept commercial support.
  • All persons involved in the planning and development of this course have disclosed no relevant financial relationships or other conflicts of interest related to the course content.
  • There are no prerequisites for this course.
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Social Determinants of Pediatric Oral Health

9.95
About the Course
Focusing on changing the behaviors of high-risk individuals (mostly on substrate, microbiome, and diet), which is the usual approach in preventive dentistry has not reduced oral health inequalities; in fact, it may have increased them.5 Most behavioral approaches to date have been weak because they tend to be poorly designed and atheoretic and have largely ignored social determinants of health; thus, the recommendations are mostly anecdotal. Using caries risk assessment tools alone is not definitive because of their lack of precision, and the conditions that create dental disease have not changed.5 It is well known that the best predictor for future caries is past caries.5,6 Therefore, a different approach to establishment and maintenance of oral health in children, which leads to good oral health in adulthood, must take into account the many social and biological factors that contribute to the development of the disease.

The purpose of this course is threefold: (1) to provide a brief description and overview of the significant effect of the social determinants of oral health on children, including socioeconomic status (SES), family structure, social environment, culture and healthcare delivery systems; (2) to document the significant oral health inequalities that exist among children and the importance of social environment on oral health outcomes; (3) to advocate for the creation of interventions to improve pediatric oral health that address the interaction amongst multiple levels of risk factors in the socioecological and life course frameworks.

Course Objectives
  1. Define the key areas of social determinants of pediatric oral health.
  2. Describe the research directions to improve prevention and care.

About the Author
Karen D. Hallisey, DMD, is the dental planner at Elite Learning. She received her undergraduate degree at Saint Michael’s College in 1997 before earning her DMD from Tufts University School of Dental Medicine in 2001. Dr. Hallisey is a licensed dentist in the state of Massachusetts and is a member of both the Massachusetts Dental Society and the American Dental Association. She worked as a general dentist in private practice for ten years before deciding to enter the realm of higher education. Along with being the Dental Planner here at Elite Learning, Dr. Hallisey is an associate professor and the Supervising Dentist in the Regis College Department of Dental Hygiene. There she teaches medical emergencies to first year students, pharmacology to second year students, and also serves as the supervising dentist in the second year clinic.

AGD Subject Code: 430


Course Disclosures

  • Courses must be completed on or before the course expiration date.
  • You must score 75% or higher on the final exam and complete the course evaluation to pass this course and receive a certificate of completion.
  • Through our review processes, Elite ensures that this course content is presented in a balanced, unbiased manner and is free from commercial influence. It is Elite's policy not to accept commercial support.
  • All persons involved in the planning and development of this course have disclosed no relevant financial relationships or other conflicts of interest related to the course content.
  • There are no prerequisites for this course.