Dental: Three Drug Classes: Antibiotics, Analgesics, and Local Anesthetics Mod II: Analgesics, 2nd Ed.

19.95
Online
Mandatory
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About the Course

Oral healthcare professionals (OHCPs) are routinely involved with the selection and prescription of analgesics to address orofacial pain. In fact, dentists have been identified as the second highest prescribers of immediate-release opioids by specialty area in the United States, accounting for 12% of all prescriptions dispensed, and surpassed only by general practitioners (McCauley et al., 2016; Denisco et al., 2013). While pain has both physiological and psychological components, an experience of poorly managed pain related to dentistry can lead patients to avoid or postpone treatment, making these patients more difficult to treat and less likely to comply with prescribed regimens. Oral medications administered postoperatively that reduce pain improve clinical outcomes, making them an integral part of dental practice. Analgesic medications in dentistry are indicated for the relief of acute pain, postoperative pain, and chronic pain, and for controlling adjunctive intraoperative pain (pain not associated with the dental procedure). In addition, these medications can be given preoperatively (preemptively) to mitigate both postoperative pain and postoperative pain medication requirements. Upon completing this course, the learner will be able to discuss the differences among analgesics typically prescribed for orofacial pain. In the case of unique patient populations requiring adjuvant options, the selection and timing of appropriate medications will no longer constitute a gap in knowledge. The principles learned will also be directly applicable to the appropriate selection of analgesics for the pregnant or breastfeeding patient and will aid in recognizing those patients with a significant allergic history and determining how to best and safely treat them.

Course Objectives
  1. Describe the types and pathophysiology of orofacial pain.
  2. Differentiate among the pharmacotherapies for nociceptive orofacial pain.
  3. Distinguish among the pharmacotherapies for neuropathic orofacial pain.
  4. Identify the currently available adjuvant pharmaceuticals for orofacial pain.
  5. Select appropriate analgesics for special populations.

About the Author

Mark Donaldson, BSP, RPH, PharmD, FASHP, FACHE, received his baccalaureate degree from the University of British Columbia (UBC) and his doctorate in clinical pharmacy from the University of Washington. He has further completed a residency at Canada’s largest tertiary care facility, Vancouver General Hospital, and is the current Associate Principal for Vizient Pharmacy Advisory Solutions. Dr. Donaldson is a clinical professor in the Department of Pharmacy at the University of Montana in Missoula and clinical associate professor in both the School of Dentistry at the Oregon Health & Science University in Portland, Oregon, and the Faculty of Dentistry at UBC in Vancouver. He has a special interest in dental pharmacology and has lectured internationally to both dental and medical practitioners. Dr. Donaldson has a number of published works in the peer-reviewed literature and has co-authored several textbook chapters. He spent three years in Japan focusing on cross-cultural communication and internationalization. He currently serves on the Editorial Board for the Journal of the American Dental Association, is board certified in healthcare management, and is the past-president and current Regent of the American College of Healthcare Executives’ Montana Chapter.

AGD Subject Code: 340
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Three Drug Classes: Antibiotics, Analgesics, and Local Anesthetics Mod II: Analgesics, 2nd Ed.

19.95
About the Course

Oral healthcare professionals (OHCPs) are routinely involved with the selection and prescription of analgesics to address orofacial pain. In fact, dentists have been identified as the second highest prescribers of immediate-release opioids by specialty area in the United States, accounting for 12% of all prescriptions dispensed, and surpassed only by general practitioners (McCauley et al., 2016; Denisco et al., 2013). While pain has both physiological and psychological components, an experience of poorly managed pain related to dentistry can lead patients to avoid or postpone treatment, making these patients more difficult to treat and less likely to comply with prescribed regimens. Oral medications administered postoperatively that reduce pain improve clinical outcomes, making them an integral part of dental practice. Analgesic medications in dentistry are indicated for the relief of acute pain, postoperative pain, and chronic pain, and for controlling adjunctive intraoperative pain (pain not associated with the dental procedure). In addition, these medications can be given preoperatively (preemptively) to mitigate both postoperative pain and postoperative pain medication requirements. Upon completing this course, the learner will be able to discuss the differences among analgesics typically prescribed for orofacial pain. In the case of unique patient populations requiring adjuvant options, the selection and timing of appropriate medications will no longer constitute a gap in knowledge. The principles learned will also be directly applicable to the appropriate selection of analgesics for the pregnant or breastfeeding patient and will aid in recognizing those patients with a significant allergic history and determining how to best and safely treat them.

Course Objectives
  1. Describe the types and pathophysiology of orofacial pain.
  2. Differentiate among the pharmacotherapies for nociceptive orofacial pain.
  3. Distinguish among the pharmacotherapies for neuropathic orofacial pain.
  4. Identify the currently available adjuvant pharmaceuticals for orofacial pain.
  5. Select appropriate analgesics for special populations.

About the Author

Mark Donaldson, BSP, RPH, PharmD, FASHP, FACHE, received his baccalaureate degree from the University of British Columbia (UBC) and his doctorate in clinical pharmacy from the University of Washington. He has further completed a residency at Canada’s largest tertiary care facility, Vancouver General Hospital, and is the current Associate Principal for Vizient Pharmacy Advisory Solutions. Dr. Donaldson is a clinical professor in the Department of Pharmacy at the University of Montana in Missoula and clinical associate professor in both the School of Dentistry at the Oregon Health & Science University in Portland, Oregon, and the Faculty of Dentistry at UBC in Vancouver. He has a special interest in dental pharmacology and has lectured internationally to both dental and medical practitioners. Dr. Donaldson has a number of published works in the peer-reviewed literature and has co-authored several textbook chapters. He spent three years in Japan focusing on cross-cultural communication and internationalization. He currently serves on the Editorial Board for the Journal of the American Dental Association, is board certified in healthcare management, and is the past-president and current Regent of the American College of Healthcare Executives’ Montana Chapter.

AGD Subject Code: 340