A Clinician’s Guide to Recognizing and Responding to Human Trafficking in Texas

11.95
Online
Mandatory

Release Date: November 15, 2020

Expiration Date: September 29, 2022

This course meets the new Human Trafficking requirement and is approved by the Texas Health and Human Services Commission.

Course Overview:

Human trafficking has been called a form of modern-day slavery. It is a crime involving the exploitation of someone for the purpose of compelled labor or a commercial sex act through the use of force, fraud, or coercion. Victims can be women or men, adults or children, citizens or noncitizens and occurs across the United States and throughout the world. Human trafficking does not require crossing of international or state borders.

For clinicians and health care workers, human trafficking can be viewed as a serious health risk associated with significant physical and psychological harms.3 The abuses suffered by people who are trafficked include many forms of physical violence or abuse (e.g., beating, burning, rape, confinement) as well as many psychologically damaging tactics such as threats to themselves or their family members, blackmail, extortion, lies about the person’s rights, and confiscation of vital identity documents.

Learning Objectives:

  • Understand the types and venues of human trafficking in the United States.
  • Be better able to identify victims of human trafficking in health care settings.
  • Recognize the warning signs of human trafficking in health care settings for adults and minors.
  • Identify resources for reporting suspected victims of human trafficking.

About the Authors:

Ana E. Núñez, MD, is an Associate Dean of Diversity, Equity & Inclusion, and the Professor of Medicine at Drexel University College of Medicine.

Leon McCrea II, MD, MPH, is an associate professor in the Department of Family, Community & Preventive Medicine, and he director of the Family Medicine Residency program at Drexel University College of Medicine. He also serves as senior associate dean for diversity, equity and inclusion.

Stephen Braun, is a medical writer for Braun Medical Media. 

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A Clinician’s Guide to Recognizing and Responding to Human Trafficking in Texas

11.95

Release Date: November 15, 2020

Expiration Date: September 29, 2022

This course meets the new Human Trafficking requirement and is approved by the Texas Health and Human Services Commission.

Course Overview:

Human trafficking has been called a form of modern-day slavery. It is a crime involving the exploitation of someone for the purpose of compelled labor or a commercial sex act through the use of force, fraud, or coercion. Victims can be women or men, adults or children, citizens or noncitizens and occurs across the United States and throughout the world. Human trafficking does not require crossing of international or state borders.

For clinicians and health care workers, human trafficking can be viewed as a serious health risk associated with significant physical and psychological harms.3 The abuses suffered by people who are trafficked include many forms of physical violence or abuse (e.g., beating, burning, rape, confinement) as well as many psychologically damaging tactics such as threats to themselves or their family members, blackmail, extortion, lies about the person’s rights, and confiscation of vital identity documents.

Learning Objectives:

  • Understand the types and venues of human trafficking in the United States.
  • Be better able to identify victims of human trafficking in health care settings.
  • Recognize the warning signs of human trafficking in health care settings for adults and minors.
  • Identify resources for reporting suspected victims of human trafficking.

About the Authors:

Ana E. Núñez, MD, is an Associate Dean of Diversity, Equity & Inclusion, and the Professor of Medicine at Drexel University College of Medicine.

Leon McCrea II, MD, MPH, is an associate professor in the Department of Family, Community & Preventive Medicine, and he director of the Family Medicine Residency program at Drexel University College of Medicine. He also serves as senior associate dean for diversity, equity and inclusion.

Stephen Braun, is a medical writer for Braun Medical Media.