Medical Consequences of Acts of Terrorism and Disaster: A National Perspective

27.95
Online
Elective
About this Course

Terrorism has become a fact of daily life in the United States and most of the world.  It is not always obvious when a disaster is a terrorist attack and not all emergencies or disasters are terrorist attacks.  Understanding the basics of a disaster and/or terrorist attack, as well as the role the nurse plays in dealing with the medical consequences, syndromic surveillance/reporting requirements, and treatment, are vital to successful mitigation and response in a disaster or terrorist attack.  

Learning Outcomes: 
  • Distinguish between terrorist acts, disasters, and emergencies.
  • Explain the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Health Alert Network.
  • Correlate the different biological and chemical terrorism agents to their medical consequences.
  • Describe the signs and symptoms of exposure to and emergency treatment for victims exposed to biological and chemical agents.
  • Correlate the different radiological terrorism agents to their medical consequences.
  • Describe the signs and symptoms of exposure to and emergency treatment for victims exposed to nuclear agents.
  • Correlate the different weapons of mass destruction (WMD) to their medical consequences.
  • Describe the signs and symptoms of exposure to and emergency treatment for victims exposed to weapons of mass destruction.
  • Develop a disaster preparedness response for personal and professional terrorist response.
  • Determine when the legal rights of the public take precedence over individuals’ rights in a disaster.

About the Authors:
Laura Kay Wood, DNP, RN, CMCN; Deborah S. Adelman, Ph.D., RN, NE-BC; Mary Anne Theiss, PhD, JD, RN, CNE, CMCN

Laura Kay Wood, DNP, RN, CMCN, is a professor of graduate nursing at Purdue University Global. She received her DNP in executive leadership. Her evidence-based practice (EBP) project focused on disaster nurse competencies. She holds a Master’s of Science in Nursing (MSN) in nursing education from Kaplan University. Her Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) is from Kaplan University. She is a board-certified managed care nurse. She has written and presented on disaster nursing.

Deborah S. Adelman, Ph.D., RN, NE-BC, is a professor of graduate nursing at Purdue University Global and a noted disaster nursing specialist who has responded to national and local disasters. She has published a disaster nursing textbook, continuing education (CE) disaster offerings, written numerous disaster nursing articles, and given presentations to various organizations on disaster nursing and response. She holds a Doctor of Philosophy with a human resource education focus from the University of Illinois, Urbana/Champaign College of Education, and received a Master of Science in nursing in nursing administration with a focus on public health nursing from the University of Illinois, University Center. She has a Bachelor of Science in nursing from the University of Illinois, Medical Center, College of Nursing. She is a board-certified nurse executive and has held a variety of positions within nursing in mental health, public health, and nursing administration.

Mary Anne Theiss, PhD, JD, RN, CNE, CMCN, is a professor of graduate nursing at Purdue University Global. As an attorney she brings a legal perspective to the area of disaster nursing. She has written and presented in disaster nursing. She holds a law degree from Syracuse University with a specialization in medical litigation, a PhD from Capella University in education with a specialization in instructional design for online learning, and a Master’s in Nursing (MSN) from Syracuse University as a clinical nurse specialist. She is board-certified as a nurse educator and managed-care nurse.
Want Unlimited CE? Become a Member

Medical Consequences of Acts of Terrorism and Disaster: A National Perspective

27.95
About this Course

Terrorism has become a fact of daily life in the United States and most of the world.  It is not always obvious when a disaster is a terrorist attack and not all emergencies or disasters are terrorist attacks.  Understanding the basics of a disaster and/or terrorist attack, as well as the role the nurse plays in dealing with the medical consequences, syndromic surveillance/reporting requirements, and treatment, are vital to successful mitigation and response in a disaster or terrorist attack.  

Learning Outcomes: 
  • Distinguish between terrorist acts, disasters, and emergencies.
  • Explain the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Health Alert Network.
  • Correlate the different biological and chemical terrorism agents to their medical consequences.
  • Describe the signs and symptoms of exposure to and emergency treatment for victims exposed to biological and chemical agents.
  • Correlate the different radiological terrorism agents to their medical consequences.
  • Describe the signs and symptoms of exposure to and emergency treatment for victims exposed to nuclear agents.
  • Correlate the different weapons of mass destruction (WMD) to their medical consequences.
  • Describe the signs and symptoms of exposure to and emergency treatment for victims exposed to weapons of mass destruction.
  • Develop a disaster preparedness response for personal and professional terrorist response.
  • Determine when the legal rights of the public take precedence over individuals’ rights in a disaster.

About the Authors:
Laura Kay Wood, DNP, RN, CMCN; Deborah S. Adelman, Ph.D., RN, NE-BC; Mary Anne Theiss, PhD, JD, RN, CNE, CMCN

Laura Kay Wood, DNP, RN, CMCN, is a professor of graduate nursing at Purdue University Global. She received her DNP in executive leadership. Her evidence-based practice (EBP) project focused on disaster nurse competencies. She holds a Master’s of Science in Nursing (MSN) in nursing education from Kaplan University. Her Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) is from Kaplan University. She is a board-certified managed care nurse. She has written and presented on disaster nursing.

Deborah S. Adelman, Ph.D., RN, NE-BC, is a professor of graduate nursing at Purdue University Global and a noted disaster nursing specialist who has responded to national and local disasters. She has published a disaster nursing textbook, continuing education (CE) disaster offerings, written numerous disaster nursing articles, and given presentations to various organizations on disaster nursing and response. She holds a Doctor of Philosophy with a human resource education focus from the University of Illinois, Urbana/Champaign College of Education, and received a Master of Science in nursing in nursing administration with a focus on public health nursing from the University of Illinois, University Center. She has a Bachelor of Science in nursing from the University of Illinois, Medical Center, College of Nursing. She is a board-certified nurse executive and has held a variety of positions within nursing in mental health, public health, and nursing administration.

Mary Anne Theiss, PhD, JD, RN, CNE, CMCN, is a professor of graduate nursing at Purdue University Global. As an attorney she brings a legal perspective to the area of disaster nursing. She has written and presented in disaster nursing. She holds a law degree from Syracuse University with a specialization in medical litigation, a PhD from Capella University in education with a specialization in instructional design for online learning, and a Master’s in Nursing (MSN) from Syracuse University as a clinical nurse specialist. She is board-certified as a nurse educator and managed-care nurse.