Pediatric Headaches: Recognizing the Warning Signs

22.95
Online
Elective
About the Course

A headache in a child may be benign or may signal a medical emergency. How can you tell the difference? What are signs and symptoms specific to infants, children, and adolescents?  This course will help nurses who are experienced in pediatrics or are new to the pediatric population to identify those with serious or life-threatening causes or “red flags".  The course describes signs and symptoms specific to children, distinguishes between different types of pediatric headaches, explores recurrent headaches in children and adolescents, and considers headache prevention strategies.  An exploration of the components of the pediatric history and neurological exam is discussed and various examples of primary headaches and secondary headaches are described. 

Learning Outcomes:
Upon completion of this course, the learner should be able to:
  • Identify red flags in clinical presentation and history taking of a child with a headache.
  • Describe the characteristics, signs and symptoms, assessment, and management of different types of headaches in children.
  • Distinguish between primary and secondary headaches.
  • Explain the importance of good history taking with both parent and child.
  • Identify ways to educate parents and children regarding headaches to promote headache prevention, decrease headache frequency, reduce the risk of falling and head trauma, and allow children and adolescents to help manage their own headache care through the incorporation of patient education into the nurse’s practice.
  • Lead the effort to provide children and families with outside resources such as mental health specialists and counselors to treat possible underlying stress, anxiety, and school issues for children who attribute stress to their recurrent headaches.
  • Describe differences in how young children and adults present with headaches.

About the Author:
Margaret Nihoul, MSN, RN, CPNP-PC

Margaret Nihoul, MSN, RN, CPNP-PC, is a pediatric nurse practitioner who graduated from the Yale School of Nursing in 2016 with a concentration in global health. Her interest in health care started at a young age when she had several opportunities to shadow doctors in France and Belgium. She currently works in student health at a large university in Boston. Prior to, she worked at community-based and school-based health centers providing primary care to high-risk, medically underserved populations and in a private pediatric clinic in Connecticut and at an overnight summer camp in New York.
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Pediatric Headaches: Recognizing the Warning Signs

22.95
About the Course

A headache in a child may be benign or may signal a medical emergency. How can you tell the difference? What are signs and symptoms specific to infants, children, and adolescents?  This course will help nurses who are experienced in pediatrics or are new to the pediatric population to identify those with serious or life-threatening causes or “red flags".  The course describes signs and symptoms specific to children, distinguishes between different types of pediatric headaches, explores recurrent headaches in children and adolescents, and considers headache prevention strategies.  An exploration of the components of the pediatric history and neurological exam is discussed and various examples of primary headaches and secondary headaches are described. 

Learning Outcomes:
Upon completion of this course, the learner should be able to:
  • Identify red flags in clinical presentation and history taking of a child with a headache.
  • Describe the characteristics, signs and symptoms, assessment, and management of different types of headaches in children.
  • Distinguish between primary and secondary headaches.
  • Explain the importance of good history taking with both parent and child.
  • Identify ways to educate parents and children regarding headaches to promote headache prevention, decrease headache frequency, reduce the risk of falling and head trauma, and allow children and adolescents to help manage their own headache care through the incorporation of patient education into the nurse’s practice.
  • Lead the effort to provide children and families with outside resources such as mental health specialists and counselors to treat possible underlying stress, anxiety, and school issues for children who attribute stress to their recurrent headaches.
  • Describe differences in how young children and adults present with headaches.

About the Author:
Margaret Nihoul, MSN, RN, CPNP-PC

Margaret Nihoul, MSN, RN, CPNP-PC, is a pediatric nurse practitioner who graduated from the Yale School of Nursing in 2016 with a concentration in global health. Her interest in health care started at a young age when she had several opportunities to shadow doctors in France and Belgium. She currently works in student health at a large university in Boston. Prior to, she worked at community-based and school-based health centers providing primary care to high-risk, medically underserved populations and in a private pediatric clinic in Connecticut and at an overnight summer camp in New York.