Nursing: Postcombat-Related Disorders: Counseling Veterans and Military Personnel, 2nd Edition

27.95
Online
Elective
About the Course

This course provides an overview of military culture, common deployment-related health problems, and an introduction to evidence-based treatments for these conditions. The course discusses cultural issues that affect treatment with military and veteran patients and those interventions and treatments shown to contribute to the largest and most enduring outcomes for this population. Case examples are used to illustrate concepts, with a particular emphasis on how to adapt and “translate” mental health interventions to better align with military cultural ideals and concepts to increase their effectiveness with military and veteran patients. 

Learning Outcomes: 
Upon completion of this course, the learner will be able to:
  • Describe differences between military and mental health cultural norms and their impact on how combat veterans access mental health services.
  • Explain the challenges that combat veterans and their families face when transitioning, reintegrating, and readjusting from deployment.
  • Describe the prevalence, diagnostic criteria, and treatments for post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and depression among combat veterans.
  • Describe effective treatments for suicidal behaviors, substance use, and traumatic brain injury among veterans with PTSD and depression.

About the Authors:

Craig J. Bryan, PsyD, ABPP, is a board-certified clinical psychologist in cognitive behavioral psychology and is currently the executive director of the National Center for Veterans Studies at The University of Utah. Dr. Bryan received his PsyD in clinical psychology in 2006 from Baylor University and completed his clinical psychology residency at the Wilford Hall Medical Center, Lackland Air Force Base, Texas. He was on faculty in the Department of Psychology at Wilford Hall Medical Center, where he was chief of the primary care psychology service and manager of the suicide prevention program for Lackland Air Force Base. Dr. Bryan deployed to Balad, Iraq, in 2009, where he served as the director of the traumatic brain injury clinic at the Air Force Theater Hospital. After completing his contractual requirements, Dr. Bryan voluntarily separated from active-duty service shortly after his deployment. Considered a leading national expert on military suicide, Dr. Bryan is a consultant to the Department of Defense for psychological health promotion initiatives and suicide prevention and has briefed Congressional leaders on these topics. He has authored 100+ scientific publications and book chapters on suicide risk and prevention among military personnel. Dr. Bryan was recognized by the Society for Military Psychology with the Arthur W. Melton Award for Early Career Achievement.

David C. Rozek, PhD, is a clinical psychologist and holds a primary appointment at The University of Utah in the Department of Psychiatry with a secondary appointment as the Director of Training at the National Center for Veterans Studies. He received his PhD from the University of Notre Dame and completed his residency at the Orlando Veterans Affairs Medical Center. Dr. Rozek’s research and clinical expertise are in cognitive and behavioral therapies for suicide, depression, and post-traumatic stress disorder. He regularly provides training to clinicians and medical professionals about managing suicidal patients and is an active researcher focusing on how to best improve clinical care.
Want Unlimited CE? Become a Member

Nursing: Postcombat-Related Disorders: Counseling Veterans and Military Personnel, 2nd Edition

27.95
About the Course

This course provides an overview of military culture, common deployment-related health problems, and an introduction to evidence-based treatments for these conditions. The course discusses cultural issues that affect treatment with military and veteran patients and those interventions and treatments shown to contribute to the largest and most enduring outcomes for this population. Case examples are used to illustrate concepts, with a particular emphasis on how to adapt and “translate” mental health interventions to better align with military cultural ideals and concepts to increase their effectiveness with military and veteran patients. 

Learning Outcomes: 
Upon completion of this course, the learner will be able to:
  • Describe differences between military and mental health cultural norms and their impact on how combat veterans access mental health services.
  • Explain the challenges that combat veterans and their families face when transitioning, reintegrating, and readjusting from deployment.
  • Describe the prevalence, diagnostic criteria, and treatments for post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and depression among combat veterans.
  • Describe effective treatments for suicidal behaviors, substance use, and traumatic brain injury among veterans with PTSD and depression.

About the Authors:

Craig J. Bryan, PsyD, ABPP, is a board-certified clinical psychologist in cognitive behavioral psychology and is currently the executive director of the National Center for Veterans Studies at The University of Utah. Dr. Bryan received his PsyD in clinical psychology in 2006 from Baylor University and completed his clinical psychology residency at the Wilford Hall Medical Center, Lackland Air Force Base, Texas. He was on faculty in the Department of Psychology at Wilford Hall Medical Center, where he was chief of the primary care psychology service and manager of the suicide prevention program for Lackland Air Force Base. Dr. Bryan deployed to Balad, Iraq, in 2009, where he served as the director of the traumatic brain injury clinic at the Air Force Theater Hospital. After completing his contractual requirements, Dr. Bryan voluntarily separated from active-duty service shortly after his deployment. Considered a leading national expert on military suicide, Dr. Bryan is a consultant to the Department of Defense for psychological health promotion initiatives and suicide prevention and has briefed Congressional leaders on these topics. He has authored 100+ scientific publications and book chapters on suicide risk and prevention among military personnel. Dr. Bryan was recognized by the Society for Military Psychology with the Arthur W. Melton Award for Early Career Achievement.

David C. Rozek, PhD, is a clinical psychologist and holds a primary appointment at The University of Utah in the Department of Psychiatry with a secondary appointment as the Director of Training at the National Center for Veterans Studies. He received his PhD from the University of Notre Dame and completed his residency at the Orlando Veterans Affairs Medical Center. Dr. Rozek’s research and clinical expertise are in cognitive and behavioral therapies for suicide, depression, and post-traumatic stress disorder. He regularly provides training to clinicians and medical professionals about managing suicidal patients and is an active researcher focusing on how to best improve clinical care.