Sleepless in the Hospital: Strategies for Promoting Quality Sleep for Patients

11.95
Online
Elective

About the Course


Target Audience: Nurses looking to strengthen their awareness of risk factors for poor sleep in the hospital, especially nurses on inpatient units or units where patients are sleeping. This could also be beneficial for nurses working in nursing homes or providing home care overnight.

Course Overview: Hospitalized patients commonly experience poor sleep and report poor sleep quality. Sleep is crucial for supporting immune function and promoting restoration of health. Sleep deprivation can complicate illness and impair recovery. Nurses can play a critical role in recognizing risk of sleep disturbances in patients and intervening to promote optimal sleep. This course provides an overview of typical sleep architecture, the physiologic consequences of sleep impairment, and interventions to improve sleep quality in hospitalized patients. 

Objectives: 

  • Explain the importance and physiologic consequences of sleep deprivation in hospitalized patients.
  • Describe causes of sleep disruption in hospitalized patients.
  • Identify interventions to improve patient sleep.

About the Author

Myra F. Ellis, MSN, RN, CCRN-CSC

Myra F. Ellis is a staff nurse in the cardiothoracic intensive care unit (CTICU) at Duke University Hospital in Durham, N.C. She leads a research team in the CTICU that has developed an evidence-based sleep promotion guideline for cardiac surgery patients. This team has also studied noise, sleep satisfaction, and sleep interventions in the CTICU.

Want Unlimited CE? Become a Member

Sleepless in the Hospital: Strategies for Promoting Quality Sleep for Patients

11.95

About the Course


Target Audience: Nurses looking to strengthen their awareness of risk factors for poor sleep in the hospital, especially nurses on inpatient units or units where patients are sleeping. This could also be beneficial for nurses working in nursing homes or providing home care overnight.

Course Overview: Hospitalized patients commonly experience poor sleep and report poor sleep quality. Sleep is crucial for supporting immune function and promoting restoration of health. Sleep deprivation can complicate illness and impair recovery. Nurses can play a critical role in recognizing risk of sleep disturbances in patients and intervening to promote optimal sleep. This course provides an overview of typical sleep architecture, the physiologic consequences of sleep impairment, and interventions to improve sleep quality in hospitalized patients. 

Objectives: 

  • Explain the importance and physiologic consequences of sleep deprivation in hospitalized patients.
  • Describe causes of sleep disruption in hospitalized patients.
  • Identify interventions to improve patient sleep.

About the Author

Myra F. Ellis, MSN, RN, CCRN-CSC

Myra F. Ellis is a staff nurse in the cardiothoracic intensive care unit (CTICU) at Duke University Hospital in Durham, N.C. She leads a research team in the CTICU that has developed an evidence-based sleep promotion guideline for cardiac surgery patients. This team has also studied noise, sleep satisfaction, and sleep interventions in the CTICU.