Nursing: Traumatic Brain Injury, 2nd Edition

22.95
Online
Elective
About the Course

Approximately 2.8 million people sustain a traumatic brain injury (TBI) each year in the United States. For those who survive, treatment rarely ends upon exiting the emergency department. In fact, the complications and ramifications can be life-long.  This course discusses the identification, etiology, pathophysiology, clinical manifestations, and diagnostic tools used for all levels of TBI evaluation. The course discusses the structural and functional relationships of TBI to regions of the brain, prevention of secondary injury during initial phases of care, possible behavioral and cognitive changes associated with TBI, and the interventions needed to minimize sequelae for patients with TBI. 

Learning Outcomes:
Upon completion of this course, the learner will be able to:
  • Describe the prevalence and etiology of traumatic brain injury (TBI) in the United States.
  • Discuss the different types of TBI and the related pathophysiology.
  • Identify the signs and symptoms of TBI.
  • Discuss essential nursing care of the adult with acute TBI across the continuum of care.
  • Explain the sequelae and long-term complications from TBI.
  • Describe the prevalence and etiology of traumatic brain injury (TBI) in the United States.
  • Discuss the different types of TBI and the related pathophysiology.
  • Identify the signs and symptoms of TBI.
  • Discuss essential nursing care of the adult with acute TBI across the continuum of care.
  • Explain the sequelae and long-term complications from TBI.

About the Author:   
Esther Bay, PhD, ACNS, BSN

Esther Bay, PhD, ACNS, BSN, is a clinical associate professor with expertise in traumatic brain injury (TBI), holistic health practices, and mental health. Beginning as a trauma nurse and a critical care nurse, Dr. Bay has cared for patients with all levels of brain injury severity. Later, she realized that many people with TBI subsequently enter the mental health setting for treatment of psychiatric disorders without attention to their baseline TBI deficits. Seeking more knowledge about the psychiatric disorders that complicated the trajectory of recovery, Dr. Bay began a PhD program at the University of Michigan School of Nursing. Her dissertation focused on explanatory mechanisms of post-TBI depression and exploring cortisol responsivity. She completed a postdoctoral training program at the University of Michigan in the Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Science, that focused on aging and TBI. Dr. Bay has completed four post-PhD studies focused on persons with TBI and depression, most recently an intervention study on mindfulness approaches versus healthy living after TBI. She has presented locally, nationally, and internationally on this topic and has written more than 30 publications focused on TBI and postinjury comorbidities.
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Nursing: Traumatic Brain Injury, 2nd Edition

22.95
About the Course

Approximately 2.8 million people sustain a traumatic brain injury (TBI) each year in the United States. For those who survive, treatment rarely ends upon exiting the emergency department. In fact, the complications and ramifications can be life-long.  This course discusses the identification, etiology, pathophysiology, clinical manifestations, and diagnostic tools used for all levels of TBI evaluation. The course discusses the structural and functional relationships of TBI to regions of the brain, prevention of secondary injury during initial phases of care, possible behavioral and cognitive changes associated with TBI, and the interventions needed to minimize sequelae for patients with TBI. 

Learning Outcomes:
Upon completion of this course, the learner will be able to:
  • Describe the prevalence and etiology of traumatic brain injury (TBI) in the United States.
  • Discuss the different types of TBI and the related pathophysiology.
  • Identify the signs and symptoms of TBI.
  • Discuss essential nursing care of the adult with acute TBI across the continuum of care.
  • Explain the sequelae and long-term complications from TBI.
  • Describe the prevalence and etiology of traumatic brain injury (TBI) in the United States.
  • Discuss the different types of TBI and the related pathophysiology.
  • Identify the signs and symptoms of TBI.
  • Discuss essential nursing care of the adult with acute TBI across the continuum of care.
  • Explain the sequelae and long-term complications from TBI.

About the Author:   
Esther Bay, PhD, ACNS, BSN

Esther Bay, PhD, ACNS, BSN, is a clinical associate professor with expertise in traumatic brain injury (TBI), holistic health practices, and mental health. Beginning as a trauma nurse and a critical care nurse, Dr. Bay has cared for patients with all levels of brain injury severity. Later, she realized that many people with TBI subsequently enter the mental health setting for treatment of psychiatric disorders without attention to their baseline TBI deficits. Seeking more knowledge about the psychiatric disorders that complicated the trajectory of recovery, Dr. Bay began a PhD program at the University of Michigan School of Nursing. Her dissertation focused on explanatory mechanisms of post-TBI depression and exploring cortisol responsivity. She completed a postdoctoral training program at the University of Michigan in the Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Science, that focused on aging and TBI. Dr. Bay has completed four post-PhD studies focused on persons with TBI and depression, most recently an intervention study on mindfulness approaches versus healthy living after TBI. She has presented locally, nationally, and internationally on this topic and has written more than 30 publications focused on TBI and postinjury comorbidities.