Occupational Therapy: An Introduction to Low Vision Rehabilitation for Occupational Therapists

24.95
Online
Elective
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About the Course:
This basic introductory course is intended to familiarize the OT practitioner, who may not have received low vision education or is not comfortable intervening with this population, with current evidence-based information related to the management of patients with low vision. The course content is designed to increase the reader’s understanding of and ability to generalize concepts into the OT process when working with patients experiencing occupational performance deficits due to low vision. OT practitioners will need to pursue further education if they wish to specialize in low vision rehabilitation.

Course Objectives:
1. Distinguish between the terms visual impairment, low vision, blindness, and legal blindness.
2. Describe how age-related eye diseases can impact occupational performance and quality of life in patients who have them.
3. Describe the roles of members of the low vision rehabilitation team.
4. Identify evidence-based tools to assess patient factors in individuals with vision loss.
5. Differentiate between the generalist and specialist occupational therapy practitioner’s role in low vision rehabilitation.
6. Describe modifications and adaptive strategies to enhance the safety and independence of patients living with low vision, which can be incorporated into the occupational therapy plan of care. 

About the Author:
Orli Weisser-Pike OTD, OTR/L, CLVT, SCLV, CAPS, FAOTA, is an assistant professor of occupational therapy at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center. She has over 20 years of clinical experience in a wide variety of settings and has for the past 17 years specialized in treating people disabled by vision loss. In 2013 she received the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA) Recognition of Achievement Award for Leadership and Advancement in Low Vision; in the same year she received the AOTA Jeanette Bair Writer's Award for her article in OT Practice on caregivers of people with low vision. From 2004 to 2006 she served on the AOTA Low Vision Specialty Certification Panel that developed standards for the Specialty Certification in Low Vision (SCLV), launched in 2006, and was a portfolio reviewer for applicants seeking SCLV recognition from 2006 through 2018. Orli was an item writer and co-chair of the Subject Matter Expert Committee in Low Vision Therapy of the Academy for Vision Rehabilitation and Education Professionals (ACVREP) between 2010 and 2020 and is presently the Secretary of the Board of Directors of ACVREP. In addition to her post-professional doctoral degree in occupational therapy earned in 2013, Dr. Weisser-Pike has certifications in low vision therapy, aging in place, and neurointegrative functional rehabilitation and habilitation. She was inducted into the AOTA Roster of Fellows in 2019 for leadership in low vision practice, education, and scholarship.
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An Introduction to Low Vision Rehabilitation for Occupational Therapists

24.95
About the Course:
This basic introductory course is intended to familiarize the OT practitioner, who may not have received low vision education or is not comfortable intervening with this population, with current evidence-based information related to the management of patients with low vision. The course content is designed to increase the reader’s understanding of and ability to generalize concepts into the OT process when working with patients experiencing occupational performance deficits due to low vision. OT practitioners will need to pursue further education if they wish to specialize in low vision rehabilitation.

Course Objectives:
1. Distinguish between the terms visual impairment, low vision, blindness, and legal blindness.
2. Describe how age-related eye diseases can impact occupational performance and quality of life in patients who have them.
3. Describe the roles of members of the low vision rehabilitation team.
4. Identify evidence-based tools to assess patient factors in individuals with vision loss.
5. Differentiate between the generalist and specialist occupational therapy practitioner’s role in low vision rehabilitation.
6. Describe modifications and adaptive strategies to enhance the safety and independence of patients living with low vision, which can be incorporated into the occupational therapy plan of care. 

About the Author:
Orli Weisser-Pike OTD, OTR/L, CLVT, SCLV, CAPS, FAOTA, is an assistant professor of occupational therapy at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center. She has over 20 years of clinical experience in a wide variety of settings and has for the past 17 years specialized in treating people disabled by vision loss. In 2013 she received the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA) Recognition of Achievement Award for Leadership and Advancement in Low Vision; in the same year she received the AOTA Jeanette Bair Writer's Award for her article in OT Practice on caregivers of people with low vision. From 2004 to 2006 she served on the AOTA Low Vision Specialty Certification Panel that developed standards for the Specialty Certification in Low Vision (SCLV), launched in 2006, and was a portfolio reviewer for applicants seeking SCLV recognition from 2006 through 2018. Orli was an item writer and co-chair of the Subject Matter Expert Committee in Low Vision Therapy of the Academy for Vision Rehabilitation and Education Professionals (ACVREP) between 2010 and 2020 and is presently the Secretary of the Board of Directors of ACVREP. In addition to her post-professional doctoral degree in occupational therapy earned in 2013, Dr. Weisser-Pike has certifications in low vision therapy, aging in place, and neurointegrative functional rehabilitation and habilitation. She was inducted into the AOTA Roster of Fellows in 2019 for leadership in low vision practice, education, and scholarship.