Occupational Therapy: Ethical Practices with Older Adults, Revised Updated 1st Edition

29.95
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About the Author

Sherry M. Cummings, PhD, MSW, MA, is an associate dean and professor at the University of Tennessee College of Social Work in Nashville, where she has served on the faculty since 1998. Dr. Cummings holds a doctorate in social work from the University of Georgia, Athens, a master’s degree in social work from the University of Maryland, Baltimore, and a master’s degree in theology from Villanova University, Philadelphia. She has written and published extensively, including journal articles, books, book chapters, and government reports, and has presented papers nationally on the mental health needs of older adults, the impact of those needs on caregivers, and the ethical dilemmas in working with older clients. Dr. Cummings has been actively involved in the development of curriculum materials for gerontological training in graduate social work education and has worked closely with government agencies to promote programs addressing the mental health needs of older adults. Tennyson Dodd, BS, MTHS, is a graduate of Lipscomb University and Vanderbilt University’s Divinity School, both in Nashville. At Vanderbilt, he earned a master’s degree in theological studies. He is currently pursuing his master’s of science degree in social work at the University of Tennessee in Nashville. During his time at the University of Tennessee, Mr. Dodd has provided psychotherapy services to children in Nashville’s public school system and to students, faculty, and staff at a local university. Mr. Dodd also serves as a research assistant on issues of aging and mental health, housing, and refugees/immigrants.

Peer reviewer: Kathy Black, PhD, MSW, MSG, MPH, is an associate professor in the College of Arts and Sciences at the University of South Florida, Sarasota-Manatee, and is a Hartford Geriatric Social Work Faculty Scholar. Dr. Black obtained her doctorate from the University at Albany-SUNY, a master’s degree in social work and gerontology from the University of Southern California, Los Angeles, and a master’s degree in public health from the University of California, Los Angeles. A fellow of the Gerontological Society of America, Dr. Black has worked with older adults and their families as a nurse, social worker, andgeriatric case manager for more than 25 years in acute care and long-term care in home-based and community-based settings. She has also taught courses in ethics and served on the bioethics committee of a large integrated healthcare system.

Learning Objectives

  • Identify frameworks and principles commonly used in healthcare settings for resolving ethical problems.
  • Recognize the steps used in resolving ethical dilemmas.
  • Distinguish between capacity and competence.
  • Describe the concept of advance care planning.
  • Identify the hierarchy used in surrogate decision making.
  • Recognize ethical concerns that commonly arise related to the use of medical technologies.
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Occupational Therapy: Ethical Practices with Older Adults, Revised Updated 1st Edition

29.95

About the Author

Sherry M. Cummings, PhD, MSW, MA, is an associate dean and professor at the University of Tennessee College of Social Work in Nashville, where she has served on the faculty since 1998. Dr. Cummings holds a doctorate in social work from the University of Georgia, Athens, a master’s degree in social work from the University of Maryland, Baltimore, and a master’s degree in theology from Villanova University, Philadelphia. She has written and published extensively, including journal articles, books, book chapters, and government reports, and has presented papers nationally on the mental health needs of older adults, the impact of those needs on caregivers, and the ethical dilemmas in working with older clients. Dr. Cummings has been actively involved in the development of curriculum materials for gerontological training in graduate social work education and has worked closely with government agencies to promote programs addressing the mental health needs of older adults. Tennyson Dodd, BS, MTHS, is a graduate of Lipscomb University and Vanderbilt University’s Divinity School, both in Nashville. At Vanderbilt, he earned a master’s degree in theological studies. He is currently pursuing his master’s of science degree in social work at the University of Tennessee in Nashville. During his time at the University of Tennessee, Mr. Dodd has provided psychotherapy services to children in Nashville’s public school system and to students, faculty, and staff at a local university. Mr. Dodd also serves as a research assistant on issues of aging and mental health, housing, and refugees/immigrants.

Peer reviewer: Kathy Black, PhD, MSW, MSG, MPH, is an associate professor in the College of Arts and Sciences at the University of South Florida, Sarasota-Manatee, and is a Hartford Geriatric Social Work Faculty Scholar. Dr. Black obtained her doctorate from the University at Albany-SUNY, a master’s degree in social work and gerontology from the University of Southern California, Los Angeles, and a master’s degree in public health from the University of California, Los Angeles. A fellow of the Gerontological Society of America, Dr. Black has worked with older adults and their families as a nurse, social worker, andgeriatric case manager for more than 25 years in acute care and long-term care in home-based and community-based settings. She has also taught courses in ethics and served on the bioethics committee of a large integrated healthcare system.

Learning Objectives

  • Identify frameworks and principles commonly used in healthcare settings for resolving ethical problems.
  • Recognize the steps used in resolving ethical dilemmas.
  • Distinguish between capacity and competence.
  • Describe the concept of advance care planning.
  • Identify the hierarchy used in surrogate decision making.
  • Recognize ethical concerns that commonly arise related to the use of medical technologies.