Cerebral Palsy Across the Lifespan, 2nd ed

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About the Author

Lisa Dannemiller, PT, DSc, PCS, has had more than 28 years of clinical experience working with persons with developmental disabilities, including those with cerebral palsy and other neuromuscular conditions. In her current clinical practice, she participates in a diagnostic evaluation team for young children with neurodevelopmental concerns and provides outpatient physical therapy for children. Dr. Dannemiller is an assistant professor in the University of Colorado Physical Therapy Program, where her primary teaching responsibilities include the pediatric content in the neuromuscular and musculoskeletal tracks.  She received a bachelor of science degree in physical therapy from the Medical College of Virginia and a doctor of science degree in pediatric physical therapy from Rocky Mountain University of Health Professions. She is a pediatric certified specialist with the American Board of Physical Therapy Specialties. Dr. Dannemiller has presented nationally on topics related to cerebral palsy,
autism, and physical therapy education.

Content editor: 
Debbie Thorpe, PT, PhD, has been a pediatric physical therapist, academician, and researcher for more than 25 years. She obtained a bachelor’s degree in physical therapy from the University of New England, a master’s degree in early childhood motor development and motor learning from West Virginia University, and a PhD in
pediatric physical therapy from the Medical College of Pennsylvania and Hahnemann University. She has been a pediatric certified specialist of the American Physical Therapy Association (APTA) for more than 20 years. She is currently an associate professor at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. In 2013, Dr. Thorpe received the APTA Section on Pediatrics Anniversary Award for outstanding, visionary contributions in pediatric physical therapy – including practice, research, mentoring, and leadership. Dr. Thorpe’s research and publications focus on fitness, physical activity, and health promotion for persons with cerebral palsy (CP) across the life course. She has presented her research both nationally and internationally.

Learning Objectives
  • Identify the prevalence, primary etiologies, diagnostic criteria/guidelines, and common problems associated with cerebral palsy.
  • Describe the different methods used to classify cerebral palsy.
  • Describe the models used in clinical decision making for individuals with cerebral palsy.
  • Describe a physical therapy examination, including the most appropriate tests and measures for individuals with cerebral palsy.
  • Identify secondary conditions that develop in adults with cerebral palsy.
  • Describe the prognosis for individuals with cerebral palsy.
  • Describe the evaluation process and components of the plan of care for individuals with cerebral palsy.
  • Identify interventions for individuals with cerebral palsy that are best supported by current evidence.
  • Describe the role of the physical and occupational therapist in the continuum of care and family-centered care.
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Cerebral Palsy Across the Lifespan, 2nd ed

48.00
About the Author

Lisa Dannemiller, PT, DSc, PCS, has had more than 28 years of clinical experience working with persons with developmental disabilities, including those with cerebral palsy and other neuromuscular conditions. In her current clinical practice, she participates in a diagnostic evaluation team for young children with neurodevelopmental concerns and provides outpatient physical therapy for children. Dr. Dannemiller is an assistant professor in the University of Colorado Physical Therapy Program, where her primary teaching responsibilities include the pediatric content in the neuromuscular and musculoskeletal tracks.  She received a bachelor of science degree in physical therapy from the Medical College of Virginia and a doctor of science degree in pediatric physical therapy from Rocky Mountain University of Health Professions. She is a pediatric certified specialist with the American Board of Physical Therapy Specialties. Dr. Dannemiller has presented nationally on topics related to cerebral palsy,
autism, and physical therapy education.

Content editor: 
Debbie Thorpe, PT, PhD, has been a pediatric physical therapist, academician, and researcher for more than 25 years. She obtained a bachelor’s degree in physical therapy from the University of New England, a master’s degree in early childhood motor development and motor learning from West Virginia University, and a PhD in
pediatric physical therapy from the Medical College of Pennsylvania and Hahnemann University. She has been a pediatric certified specialist of the American Physical Therapy Association (APTA) for more than 20 years. She is currently an associate professor at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. In 2013, Dr. Thorpe received the APTA Section on Pediatrics Anniversary Award for outstanding, visionary contributions in pediatric physical therapy – including practice, research, mentoring, and leadership. Dr. Thorpe’s research and publications focus on fitness, physical activity, and health promotion for persons with cerebral palsy (CP) across the life course. She has presented her research both nationally and internationally.

Learning Objectives
  • Identify the prevalence, primary etiologies, diagnostic criteria/guidelines, and common problems associated with cerebral palsy.
  • Describe the different methods used to classify cerebral palsy.
  • Describe the models used in clinical decision making for individuals with cerebral palsy.
  • Describe a physical therapy examination, including the most appropriate tests and measures for individuals with cerebral palsy.
  • Identify secondary conditions that develop in adults with cerebral palsy.
  • Describe the prognosis for individuals with cerebral palsy.
  • Describe the evaluation process and components of the plan of care for individuals with cerebral palsy.
  • Identify interventions for individuals with cerebral palsy that are best supported by current evidence.
  • Describe the role of the physical and occupational therapist in the continuum of care and family-centered care.