Physical Therapy: Ethical Practices With Older Adults, Updated

32.00
Online
Elective
Please select your state to enroll in this course
About the Course: 
In coming years, healthcare professionals will face this aging of the population, along with the accompanying health and economic challenges. The purpose of this course is to highlight ethical issues that may confront healthcare and behavioral health professionals working with older adults and their families as these individuals near the end of life. Many of these issues are related to advances in medical technologies that have occurred over the past several decades (and that continue to be developed) and have led to increasingly complex choices. The course will provide background on ethical frameworks and principles used in healthcare settings for guidance in resolving ethical problems. This course will also identify major ethical issues concerning older adults and healthcare decisions and provide a model for addressing ethical dilemmas in healthcare settings. 


Course Objectives: 
After completing this course, the learner will be able to: 
1) Identify ethical frameworks commonly used in healthcare for resolving ethical problems. 
 2) Identify the ethical principles used in healthcare ethics and examples of each in the Core Ethics Documents of the American Physical Therapy Association. 
3) Describe the steps used in resolving ethical dilemmas. 
4) Describe the various aspects of healthcare decision making. 
5) Recognize ethical concerns that commonly arise related to the use of medical technologies. 

About the Authors: 
Sherry M. Cummings, PhD, MSW, MA, is an associate dean and professor at the University of Tennessee College of Social Work in Nashville, where she has served on the faculty since 1998. Dr. Cummings holds a doctorate in social work from the University of Georgia, Athens, a master’s degree in social work from the University of Maryland, Baltimore, and a master’s degree in theology from Villanova University, Philadelphia. She has written and published extensively, including journal articles, books, book chapters, and government reports, and has presented papers nationally on the mental health needs of older adults, the impact of those needs on caregivers, and the ethical dilemmas in working with older clients. Dr. Cummings has been actively involved in the development of curriculum materials for gerontological training in graduate social work education and has worked closely with government agencies to promote programs addressing the mental health needs of older adults. 

Tennyson Dodd, BS, MTHS, is a graduate of Lipscomb University and Vanderbilt University’s Divinity School, both in Nashville. At Vanderbilt, he earned a master’s degree in theological studies. He is currently pursuing his master of science degree in social work at the University of Tennessee in Nashville. During his time at the University of Tennessee, Mr. Dodd has provided psychotherapy services to children in Nashville’s public school system and to students, faculty, and staff at a local university. Mr. Dodd also serves as a research assistant on issues of aging and mental health, housing, and refugees/immigrants.
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Ethical Practices With Older Adults, Updated

32.00
About the Course: 
In coming years, healthcare professionals will face this aging of the population, along with the accompanying health and economic challenges. The purpose of this course is to highlight ethical issues that may confront healthcare and behavioral health professionals working with older adults and their families as these individuals near the end of life. Many of these issues are related to advances in medical technologies that have occurred over the past several decades (and that continue to be developed) and have led to increasingly complex choices. The course will provide background on ethical frameworks and principles used in healthcare settings for guidance in resolving ethical problems. This course will also identify major ethical issues concerning older adults and healthcare decisions and provide a model for addressing ethical dilemmas in healthcare settings. 


Course Objectives: 
After completing this course, the learner will be able to: 
1) Identify ethical frameworks commonly used in healthcare for resolving ethical problems. 
 2) Identify the ethical principles used in healthcare ethics and examples of each in the Core Ethics Documents of the American Physical Therapy Association. 
3) Describe the steps used in resolving ethical dilemmas. 
4) Describe the various aspects of healthcare decision making. 
5) Recognize ethical concerns that commonly arise related to the use of medical technologies. 

About the Authors: 
Sherry M. Cummings, PhD, MSW, MA, is an associate dean and professor at the University of Tennessee College of Social Work in Nashville, where she has served on the faculty since 1998. Dr. Cummings holds a doctorate in social work from the University of Georgia, Athens, a master’s degree in social work from the University of Maryland, Baltimore, and a master’s degree in theology from Villanova University, Philadelphia. She has written and published extensively, including journal articles, books, book chapters, and government reports, and has presented papers nationally on the mental health needs of older adults, the impact of those needs on caregivers, and the ethical dilemmas in working with older clients. Dr. Cummings has been actively involved in the development of curriculum materials for gerontological training in graduate social work education and has worked closely with government agencies to promote programs addressing the mental health needs of older adults. 

Tennyson Dodd, BS, MTHS, is a graduate of Lipscomb University and Vanderbilt University’s Divinity School, both in Nashville. At Vanderbilt, he earned a master’s degree in theological studies. He is currently pursuing his master of science degree in social work at the University of Tennessee in Nashville. During his time at the University of Tennessee, Mr. Dodd has provided psychotherapy services to children in Nashville’s public school system and to students, faculty, and staff at a local university. Mr. Dodd also serves as a research assistant on issues of aging and mental health, housing, and refugees/immigrants.